Advanced Vocabulary IELTS

List of Advanced Vocabulary for IELTS PDF | Englishan

List of Advanced Vocabulary for IELTS PDF
  1. Ingrained: (adj.) fixed firmly and deeply into the surface or inside.

He has a deeply ingrained dislike of small children.

  1. Scramble: (v) to move quickly, especially with difficulty, using your hands to help you;

She managed to scramble over the wall. 

  1. Hordes: (n)  large moving crowds especially those which are noisy or disorderly.

Hordes of children were running round the building.

  1. Itemize: (v) to produce a detailed list of things.

The report itemizes 23 different faults.

  1. Laconic: (adj.) using very few words to express what you mean.

He has a laconic way of speaking.

  1. Malice: (n) the wish, desire or intention to harm someone.

He got no advantage out of it; he did it from pure malice.

  1. Nonplus: (v) to cause someone to be surprised and not know what to think or do.

The speaker seemed completely nonplussed by my question.

  1. Proclivity: (n)  propensity.

The opposition leader criticized the government’s proclivity for (towards) spending money.

  1. Marauding: (adj.) moving around in search of something to steal, bum or destroy.

They were attacked by marauding tribesmen.

  1. Ingenuous: (adj.) simple, direct, and inexperienced; naive.

Only the most ingenuous person would believe such a feeble excuse.

  1. Gross, (adj.) Clearly wrong; inexcusable.

The court found the doctor guilty of gross negligence.

  1. Beholden: (adj) having to feel grateful or having a duty (to).

I like to do things for myself and not feel beholden to anyone else,

  1. Ineffable: (adj.) too wonderful to be described.

It was an ineffable display of fireworks.

  1. Morose: (adj.) miserable; bad tempered; not willing to talk.

She was morose, pale, and reticent. 

  1. Cleavage: (n) a break caused by splitting.

There is a sharp cleavage in our society between the rich and the poor.

  1. Compatible: (adj.) able to exist together, live together or with another thing.

Their marriage ended because they were simply not compatible.

  1. Malleable: (adj.)  soft and easily made into different shapes.

She is young enough to be malleable.

  1. Dynamics: (n. pi) the way in which people or things behave and react to each other in a particular situation.

He is sadly unaware of the dynamics of political change.

  1. Ordeal: (n) a difficult or painful experience.

The parents went through a terrible ordeal when their child was kidnapped.

  1. Ordeal: (n) a difficult or painful experience.

The parents went through a terrible ordeal when their child was kidnapped.

Vocabulary for IELTS Writing Task 2 Band 8

  1. Straightjacket: (n) something which prevents free development; also spelled as “straitjacket”.

Film producers protested against the straightjacket of censorship.

  1. Reflex: (n) an unintentional movement that is made in reply to some outside influence.

The doctor hit my knee with a hammer to test my reflexes.

  1. Kudos: (n) public admiration and glory for something done.

He gained a lot of kudos by winning the essay competition.

  1. Antithesis: (n) the direct opposite.

The antithesis of life is death.

  1. Dither: (v) to behave nervously and uncertainly because one cannot decide.

For God’s sake stop dithering and make up your mind.

  1. Grievous: (adj.) very seriously harmful.

You have made a grievous mistake, which could affect the rest of your life.

  1. Hinge: (v) to depend on; have as a necessary condition.

The film’s plot hinges on a case of mistaken identity.

  1. Circumscribe: (v) to keep within narrow limits

His activities have been seriously circumscribed since his illness.

  1. Lax: (adj.)  careless.

Lax security allowed the thieves to enter.

  1. Brazen: (adj.) without shame; immodest.

That he has been dismissed is a brazen lie.

  1. Obtuse: (adj.) annoyingly slow in understanding.

Is he stupid or is he being deliberately obtuse?

  1. Nemesis: (n) punishment or defeat that is deserved and cannot be avoided.

His delinquent son proved to be his nemesis.

  1. Meticulous: (adj.)  fastidious; thorough.

He is always meticulous in keeping the records up-to-date.

  1. Ignominious: (adj.) bringing or deserving strong (especially public) disapproval damaging to one’s pride.

He had to suffer an ignominious defeat. 

  1. Psychosis: (n) Psychosis: (n) a serious mental illness that affects the whole personality.

A person suffering from psychosis loses touch with reality.

  1. Legion: (adj.) very many.

Her admirers are legion.

  1. Malice: (n)  the wish, desire or intention to harm someone.

He got no advantage out of it; he did it from pure malice.

  1. Detonate: (v) to (cause to) explode using special apparatus.

They detonated the bomb and destroyed the bridge.

  1. futile: (adj.)  useless; unsuccessful.

Don’t waste time by asking futile questions.

  1. Neurosis: (n)  anxiety.

Her neurosis is telling upon her health.

IELTS Vocabulary List

  1. Largesse: (n) [something given in] generosity to people who do not have enough.

Our people are in no need of richer nations largesse.

  1. Proliferation: (n)   a rapid increase or spreading.

The proliferation of nuclear weapons should be discouraged.

  1. Euphoria: (n) a feeling of extreme happiness usually last on a short time.

The parents were in a state of euphoria after the baby was born.

  1. Execrable: (adj.) very bad or unpleasant.

Accusing us of being disloyal to cover his own sorry behaviour is truly execrable.

  1. Levity: (n)  lack of seriousness.

This is no time for levity; we have important matters to discuss.

  1. Dynamics: (n. pi) the way in which people or things behave and react to each other in a particular situation.

He is sadly unaware of the dynamics of political change.

  1. Antithesis: (n) the direct opposite.

The antithesis of life is death.

  1. Latitude: (n)freedom to do, say, etc. what one likes.

The new law allows firms a lot less latitude than before infixing the price of their goods.

  1. Morose: (adj.) not willing to talk.

She was morose, pale, and reticent.

  1. Grievous: (adj.) very seriously harmful.

You have made a grievous mistake, which could affect the rest of your life.

  1. Dither: (v) to behave nervously and uncertainly because one cannot decide.

For God’s sake stop dithering and make up your mind.

  1. Muster: (v) to gather or collect.

I mustered (up) my courage and walked onto the stage.

  1. Pragmatic: (adj.)  realistic.

He has a pragmatic approach to management problems.

  1. Hinge: (v) to depend on; have as a necessary condition.

The film’s plot hinges on a case of mistaken identity.

  1. Mainstream: (n) The main or most widely accepted way of thinking or acting in relation to a subject.

These days he is not in the mainstream of politics.

  1. Obtuse: (adj.) annoyingly slow in understanding.

Is he stupid or is he being deliberately obtuse?

  1. Ignominious: (adj.) bringing or deserving strong (especially public) disapproval damaging to one’s pride.

He had to suffer an ignominious defeat.

  1. Irrevocable: (adj.) that cannot be changed.

My decision is irrevocable.

  1. Motley: (adj.) of many different kinds.

There was a motley collection of books on the shelf.

  1. Expertise: (n) special skills or knowledge in a particular subject.

There we met some trainee engineers with varying degrees of computer expertise.

List of Advanced Vocabulary

  1. Muster: (v) to gather or collect.

I mustered (up) my courage and walked onto the stage.

  1. Pernicious: (adj.) very harmful but not easily noticeable; having or being an evil influence.

These horror videos have a pernicious effect on children.

  1. Colossal: (adj.) extremely great or large.

It is a colossal waste of money.

  1. Salvage: (v) to save (goods or property) from loss or damage.

After the fire there wasn’t much furniture left worth salvaging.

  1. Manipulate: (v) control or influence in a clever way.

He knows how to manipulate the audience.

  1. Bulwark: (n) someone or something that protects or defends something such as a belief, idea, or way of life.

Our people’s support is a bulwark against the enemy.

  1. Moot: (v) to state (a question, matter, etc.) for consideration.

The question of changing the rules was mooted at the meeting.

  1. Precedence: (n) priority.

She had to learn that her wishes did not take precedence over other people’s needs.

  1. Gambit: (n) sacrifice of a piece for the sake of an advantage in the opening stages of a game.

His basic gambit is to give them presents before the interview.

  1. Enfranchise: (v) to give the right to vote at elections.

When were women enfranchised in Britain?

  1. Reflect (v) to think about something carefully and seriously.

He reflected for a moment and then began to speak again.

  1. Ascendancy: (n) a position of power, influence, or control.

He slowly gained ascendancy in the group.

  1. Harrowing: (adj.) causing great suffering and anxiety in the mind; distressing.

To see someone killed is a very harrowing experience.

  1. Loquacious: (adj.) liking to talk a lot.

I never saw a more loquacious woman than she.

  1. Languish: (v) to experience long suffering.

She languished in prison for fifteen years.

  1. Loquacious: (adj.) liking to talk a lot.

I never saw a more loquacious woman than she.

  1. Flounder: (v) to move about helplessly or with great difficulty, especially in water, mud, snow, etc.

The little dog was floundering around in the snow, so I picked it up.

  1. Menace: (n) a threat or danger.

The busy road is a menace to the children’s safety.

  1. Jumble: (n) a disorderly mixture of things or ideas.

His lecture was a jumble of confused ideas.

  1. Exegesis: (n) an explanation of a piece of writing.

This look contains a substantial exegesis of the poem ‘Waste Land’.

Speaking Vocabulary PDF

  1. Revile: (v) to express hatred of; speak very strongly and angrily.

This much reviled novel is remarkable in many ways.

  1. Jumble: (n) a disorderly mixture of things or ideas.

His lecture was a jumble of confused ideas.

  1. Harrowing: (adj.) causing great suffering and anxiety in the mind; distressing.

To see someone killed is a very harrowing experience.

  1. Coterie: (n) a small group of people who do things together.

He belongs to a small coterie of artists.

  1. Induce: (v) to lead (someone) to do something often by persuading.

Nothing could induce her to be disloyal to her husband.

  1. Putsch: (n) an attempt to get rid of a government by force, made by  military leaders  or politicians

Pakistan has a history of intrigues and putsches.

  1. Irrevocable: (adj.) that cannot be changed.

My decision is irrevocable.

  1. Dike (Dyke): (n) a wall or bank built to keep back water and prevent flooding.

The work on the new dike is in progress.

  1. Colossal: (adj.) extremely great or large.

It is a colossal waste of money.

  1. Mainstream: (n) The main or most widely accepted way of thinking or acting in relation to a subject.

These days he is not in the mainstream of politics.

  1. Futile: (adj.) useless; unsuccessful.

Don’t waste time by asking futile questions.

  1. Validate: (v) to make valid, especially legally.

In order to validate the agreement both parties signed it.

  1. Pernicious: (adj.) very harmful but not easily noticeable; having or being an evil influence.

These horror videos have a pernicious effect on children.

  1. Largesse: (n) [something given in] generosity to people who do not have enough.

Our people are in no need of richer nations  largesse.

  1. Nuance: (n) a slight delicate difference in meaning, colour etc.

There is a nuance of greater uncertainty in “I might do it” than in “I may do it”.

  1. Corollary: (n) something such as a statement or course of action that naturally follows from something else.

The government wants to spend more on defence: the corollary of that statement is that they want to spend less on everything else.

  1. Ingratiate: (v) to gain favour by making oneself pleasant, showing admiration, etc.

He is obviously trying to ingratiate himself with the boss.

  1. Flounder: (v) to move about helplessly or with great difficulty, especially in water, mud, snow, etc.

The little dog was floundering around in the snow, so I picked it up.

  1. Bastion: (n) someone or something that is regarded as strongly defending a particular principle or activity.

The club is one of the last bastions of male chauvinism.

  1. Incumbent: (n) being the duty or responsibility (of someone).

It is incumbent on/upon the purchaser to check the contract before signing.

1000 Vocabulary Words

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